top of page
Search

GERD vs. Heart Attack

Updated: Dec 2, 2022

A series of frequently asked questions comparing and contrasting GERD and heart attack


Where do you feel the pain in GERD?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can cause pain and discomfort in many areas of the body. It is important to know the GERD pain location and how it is different than chest pain. Common areas that may be affected include the chest, throat, stomach, back, and jaw. Noncardiac chest pain is the most common symptom associated with GERD. It may feel like a burning sensation or pressure behind the breastbone. Other symptoms include difficulty swallowing, dry cough, hoarseness, and a sour taste in the back of the throat. Pain in other areas of the body such as the back, jaw, or stomach may also be caused by GERD. Additionally, acid reflux can cause nausea, bloating, and a sore throat.


Where do you feel pain during a heart attack (myocardial infarction)?

Pain from a heart attack is usually felt in the chest and can spread to other areas of the body. The most common symptom of a heart attack is a crushing or squeezing chest pain that feels like an elephant sitting on your chest. This type of pain usually lasts for more than a few minutes and may come and go over time with varying intensity. Other areas of the body where a heart attack can cause pain include the arms, back, neck, and jaw. Some people may also experience shortness of breath and nausea.


What does GERD abdominal pain feel like?

GERD abdominal pain is noncardiac chest pain and usually feels like a burning sensation in the stomach or chest. It may be accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, bloating, and difficulty swallowing. The pain may feel worse after eating or when lying down. Additionally, the person may experience pressure behind the breastbone and a sour taste in the back of their throat due to the acid reflux.


Does GERD pain move around?

Yes, gastroesophageal reflux disease pain can move around and be experienced in different areas of the body. The most common symptom associated with GERD is chest pain which may feel like a burning sensation or pressure behind the breastbone. Additionally, it can cause pain and discomfort in other areas such as the throat, stomach, back, jaw, and arms.


Can GERD feel like back pain?

Yes, gastroesophageal reflux disease can cause pain and discomfort in the back. The pain may feel like a burning sensation or pressure and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, dry cough, hoarseness, and a sour taste in the back of the throat. Additionally, acid reflux can cause nausea, bloating, and a sore throat.


Where does one feel acid reflux in the chest?

Acid reflux typically causes pain in the chest, which may feel like a burning sensation or pressure behind the breastbone. The pain may worsen after eating or when lying down and can spread to other areas of the body such as the throat, stomach, back, jaw, and arms. Additionally, acid reflux can cause nausea, bloating, and a sour taste in the back of the throat.


How can you tell the difference between gastric pain and heart pain?

The key differences between GERD and a heart attack are:

• GERD is caused by acid reflux from the stomach into the esophagus, while a heart attack is caused by a lack of blood flow to the heart.

• Pain associated with GERD usually occurs in the chest, throat, stomach, back, and jaw. A heart attack usually causes chest pain that can spread to other areas of the body such as the arms, neck, and jaw. The neck jaw region is an area where pain often radiates to during a heart attack.

• Symptoms of GERD include difficulty swallowing, dry cough, hoarseness, and a sour taste in the back of the throat. Symptoms of a heart attack include crushing or squeezing chest pain that lasts for more than a few minutes and may come and go over time with varying intensity. Other symptoms may also be present such as shortness of breath and nausea.


Does GERD pain radiate?

Yes, GERD pain can radiate to other areas of the body such as the throat, stomach, back, jaw, and arms. The most common symptom associated with GERD is chest pain which may feel like a burning sensation or pressure behind the breastbone. Additionally, it can cause difficulty swallowing, dry cough, hoarseness,


What are Atypical Symptoms of GERD?

Atypical symptoms of GERD can include nausea, vomiting, and a feeling of fullness in the stomach. Additionally, GERD can cause a sore throat, difficulty swallowing, and a hoarse voice. People with GERD may also experience chest pain that is not related to heartburn which can complicate the diagnosis.


Acid Reflux, GERD or Angina: What's the Difference?

The main difference between acid reflux, GERD and angina is the cause. Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid flows back into the esophagus; this regurgitation causes a sour taste in the mouth, while GERD is a more severe form of acid reflux. GERD symptoms, pain or discomfort, are manifestations of noncardiac chest pain. Angina is chest pain caused by an inadequate supply of oxygen to the heart muscle due to blockages in the coronary arteries. If blood pressure is abnormally low, there is excess fluid in the lungs or abnormal heart sounds, and the person is sweating excessively, the doctor is more likely to suspect angina. All three conditions can cause pain and discomfort, but the treatments for each vary. Acid reflux and GERD can be treated with lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter medications, or prescription medications. Angina is usually treated with medications such as nitrates or beta blockers to improve blood flow to the heart muscle, or with surgery to remove blockages.


How to treat a Heart Attack?

If you think you or someone else is having a heart attack, it’s important to call 911 immediately as this is a medical emergency. Time is of the essence in the event of a heart attack and getting medical attention quickly can be life-saving. Treatment for a heart attack typically involves medications such as nitrates or beta blockers to improve blood flow to the heart muscle and clot-dissolving medications to break up any clots that may be blocking the arteries. Surgery such as angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) performed by the cardiovascular surgeon may also be necessary if the medical treatments are not effective.


How to treat GERD?

GERD or acid reflux can be treated in several ways. Lifestyle modifications such as eating smaller meals, avoiding certain foods and drinks, quitting smoking and elevating the head of the bed can help reduce symptoms associated with GERD. Over-the-counter antacids may also provide relief from heartburn. If lifestyle changes do not work, prescription medications such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be prescribed to reduce stomach acid. Surgery involving the lower esophageal sphincter and stomach is also an option for treating severe cases of GERD that do not respond to other treatments. Your doctor may want to establish a diagnosis of GERD by performing a scope to see inside your esophagus and stomach. A form of treatment that has been around a while is sodium alginate and bicarbonate, but doctors are only starting to discover this treatment in recent times.


What are some potential long-term risks of PPI use?

Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can increase the risk of certain health issues, such as low magnesium levels, fractures, and kidney disease. Additionally, people taking PPIs may be at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. It is important to talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking a PPI, as well as the potential side effects. PPIs were initially designed to be taken for 2 weeks up to 3 times a year to treat severe acid reflux episodes. They were not intended to be taken indefinitely.


Alginate therapy for GERD

Alginate therapy is a newer treatment option for GERD that involves consuming sodium alginate, which is derived from seaweed, and bicarbonate to create a foam raft that floats on the stomach contents. This raft acts as a physical barrier between the stomach acid and pepsin and the esophagus, protecting it from irritation that may occur. Alginate therapy is generally well tolerated. Nutritist Refluxly is the best sodium alginate-bicarbonate supplement on the market today because Nutritist follows an evidence based supplement policy basing its formulation on the clinical research papers. If you want a supplement that can help with your heartburn and acid reflux, click here to try Refluxly today.





What are risks of untreated GERD?

If left untreated, GERD can lead to serious complications such as Barrett's esophagus and precancerous changes in the tissue lining the esophagus or eventually esophageal cancer. Additionally, long-term exposure of stomach acid to the throat and lungs can also lead to other health problems such as chronic cough, hoarseness, and asthma. It is important to talk with your doctor if you have any of the symptoms of GERD so treatment can begin.


Summary

GERD and heart attack are both conditions that can cause pain and discomfort. However, the causes and treatments for each condition vary. GERD is a condition that is caused by stomach acid flowing back into the esophagus, while heart attack is chest pain (angina) caused by an inadequate supply of oxygen to the heart muscle due to blockages in the coronary arteries. Treatment for a heart attack typically involves medications such as nitrates or beta blockers to improve blood flow to the heart muscle, while surgery may be necessary if the medical treatments are not effective. Treatment for GERD can involve lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter medications, or prescription medications, with supplements such as Nutritist Refluxly offering additional support.


If you have any questions, concerns, or personal experiences with GERD, please do not hesitate to share your thoughts in the Comment section below. You can also use the Contact page to reach out for a private conversation.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice. This article is intended for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult your physician for medical advice.









41 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Update on Refluxly Inventory

We are sold out on Refluxly on Amazon. We do not plan to make tablets anymore. We are reformulating Refluxly as a liquid that is easy to swallow, tastes great, and works better on heartburn. Join our

Comments


bottom of page